AZALEA - Rhododendron Species
A typical choice for landscapers due to its hardiness and lovely flowers, these unassuming ornamentals contain a toxin which can be lethal, even in small amounts. Both the plant’s leaves and nectar are known to be harmful if eaten or chewed by your dog, and can cause drooling (often a symptom of nausea), vomiting, weakness and collapse. If greater amounts of its toxins are ingested, it can lead to severe poisoning, possible coma and even death. 

OLEANDER
Widely recognized as one of the most poisonous plants in the world, even minute quantities of Oleander can trigger a fatal response. Unlike the Azalea, every part of the Oleander is toxic, from flowers to roots. If dogs should chew on any part of this plant, they could suffer varying degrees of illness, including upset stomach, abnormal heart functioning and possibly even death. Beware of the sap, which can irritate the skin and eyes, as well as the leaves, which retain their toxicity even when dried out.

SAGO PALM
Most commonly used in planned landscapes where climates tend to be hot and dry, Sago Palms are nevertheless popular all over the U.S. While the whole plant contains harmful chemicals, it’s the seeds that contain the highest levels of toxins. Estimates currently put the percentage of animals that die after eating the seeds of the plant as high as three out of four. The incidence of Sago Palm poisoning in dogs and cats has risen 200% in the past few years, although dogs seem to enjoy the flavor of the plant and the seeds more than cats. Ingestion of Sago Palm can cause vomiting, diarrhea, liver failure and seizures.

CHRYSANTHEMUMS
Chrysanthemums are popular ornamentals blooming late in the summer and early in the fall. While beautiful, their flowers contain a natural insecticide. If a canine chews on the Chrysanthemum blooms, the insecticide can cause excessive drooling, vomiting and diarrhea.

What To Do If Your Pet Is Exposed
If your furry one is exposed to any of these toxic plants, please contact your veterinarian immediately. As is often the case in toxins and poisons, the sooner your pet receives treatment, the less likely they are to experience dramatic, and sometimes fatal, reactions

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Here is a good reference link with photos to help identify plants:

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/plants/

As a child I attended a school that had a courtyard (in Italy) full of beautiful oleanders and I remember nibbling on the leaves... maybe some of the problems I had then could be traced to this... anyhow, water under the bridge: I survived!!!! :-D

Thank you for this reminder!!!!

Ahhh Oleanders. Yeah they are toxic to people too, but I do love them for a side hedge to keep the creepers off my property. Also something called Angel's Trumpet is highly aggressive, and seriously toxic (pretty sure it's absorptive through the skin too) Great looking flowers of death :). 

I live in Georgia where there are azaleas in every yard (almost anyway) and maybe dogs are smart enough not to eat those plants? Otherwise you would expect a lot more "noise" about this I imagine.

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