So, my Darcy (5 months) is a quite easy-going Corgi (she's got her playful/active moments, but she's also relaxed and laid back half the time.  Storms never bother her, loud sounds make her jump and bark, but then she'll go right back to whatever she's doing, unbothered).

 

Well, whenever I take her to the vet, sure, she's hyper and nervous, but she does this one thing -- whenever the vet (or another technician) reaches to take her, Darcy screeches and cries LOUD, like she's VERY hurt.  And the vet always says, "I'm barely touching you!"  This has happened several times.  I just chalk it up to her being a little drama queen (because she's clearly NOT hurting at the time).  Does anyone else's Corgi act this way?

 

Sadly, today she got spayed, and as she's come out of anesthesia, she's reacted the same way (I just got a bewildered phone call from the technician who says Darcy is shrieking when they even try to touch her (even though she's under heavy pain meds and shouldn't be hurting yet).  I told her about Darcy's melodramatic tendencies, and I hope that's all it is, but I'm a little concerned.  They offered to keep her overnight, but I almost think that might stress her out more (I think she'd be calmer at home, with me - she never shrieks like that with me...).

 

Just wondering why a usually-calm, easy-going dog acts this way.  I've never had a dog who's done this before...

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Wynn is quite verbal at the vet and one even mentioned that he "might be a little spoiled" he's good there but acts like a grouch!

Pazu may have done this at the vet, but I'm not sure.  Pazu as a puppy around 6-7 months old got a soft tissue injury at the dog park when a bigger dog charged him.  I took him to the vet later that afternoon to make sure it wasn't serious. They didn't find anything on X ray.  Pazu was sore/limping for a few days and had to rest.

 

Months later, I took him in to get checked for something else and the vet wanted to re-check his injury.  And Pazu who hasn't limped for months apparently squeaked really loudly when the vet touched him gently.

 

In general when bigger pups play with smaller pups, I've observed that smaller pups will squeak loudly to just remind the bigger pups to be VERY VERY gentle or to indicate that the bite was too hard and it hurt. I think when the pup is squeaking loudly, he/she is saying, "Look every time you touch me, I get hurt so be very very very gentle!"  From a behavior standpoint, I would think it would be good if the vet or the vet tech gives the dog some pets and treats so that the pup doesn't associate them with pain.

Good idea about the treat! Wynn also would make the perfect "greeter" at the vet BUT he doesn't like the exam room!!!!!
I have worked with several corgis who do this at the vet I worked at. They can be so DRAMATIC. Funny thing is, when they are actually in pain they tend to be quite stoic. Best thing to do would be bring her into the vet, just get her weighed and get her a treat, have the techs pet her and give a treat, and then leave. Over time she will start to associate the vet with yummy good things and less with pain. Franklin grew up in a vet office but now that I'm not working at a vet currently he has become more nervous at the vet's office. We will go in a few times a month for either a weigh in or to buy food or something like that and I always make sure he gets treats and pets from the techs and he has gotten much better.
Me too!  Seanna has it down.  We go in, she runs right to the scale, then gets a little nom....it's funny when we're just going in to pick something up.

Those are wonderful tips, thanks!  Just what I was looking for.

 

This proves that it was the vet and not pain making her freak out earlier - I took her home about 6 hours ago, and she's been FINE.  Sleeping, whining just a wee bit, but VERY relaxed and comfortable.  Whew.  So glad I didn't leave her overnight.  She just needed to be home...

I definitely would recommend treats!  Ellie gets nervous out in the waiting area at the Vet's office (too many other nervous/unfamiliar animals around), but once she's in the exam rooms she's all about loving the technicians and vets.  Why?  Well, the Vet keeps a jar of treats (the heartworm chews, actually, but without any heartworm medication in them) in every room.  So when the technicians come in and do their jobs, she gets treats.  And then she gets more treats as she's getting her shots/exam/whatever else she's there for.  They've learned that they have to smoosh the treats down hard so they stick to the table, though.  Otherwise she devours them before they have a chance to do what they need to do!
Good observations Di about puppy behavior!
Our Lunais the work's biggest crybaby. When we put flea medicine on, for example, you'think we were amputating a foot.

Distraction helps for some things. Brushing only happens, for instance, if she is allowed to have her nose in a peanut butter jar.
Ahhhhh...the dramatic corgi.  I have one too.  Seanna did that the first time we took her to the vet.  Her nickname there is  "Drama Queen".  I worked with her every day...touching her like the vet would and giving her a treat after.  I only had to do it for a couple of weeks, and then she was fine.

My corgi yelps like crazy as I clip his nails, but if he's not looking at the clippers and he doesn't notice, then he doesn't make a sound.  He also cries like crazy when another dog in the dog park tries to stop him from taking a stick or something.  It's a minor bit of aggression (like a snarl) but he acts as if he was bit in the face, and won't play for the rest of the day.  The vet has been nice enough to call him "sensitive."  I've called him a drama queen myself.  I'm actually glad someone else's corgi acts like that too.  He's not afraid of thunder or noises, but when he is afraid, he's DRAMATIC. 

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